Monday, June 23, 2014

Morning Light


Image: Subject and photographer unknown.

Thursday, June 19, 2014

"Hunting a Hare"


. . . In Chinese symbolism, the hare is . . . associated with male homosexuality. W. Eberhard (1986) notes that in China, "the 'female' [i.e. receptive] partner in homosexual intercourse was known as the 'hare.' 'Hunting a hare' meant going to a brothel to look for a young man."

– Excerpted from The Encyclopedia of Queer Myth, Symbol and Spirit
by Randy P. Conner, David Hatfield Sparks and Mariya Sparks
(Cassell, 1997)


Related Off-site Links:
Westerners and Homosexuality in Asia – The Closet Professor (January 26, 2012).
Homosexuality in the Zhou Period – The Closet Professor (January 25, 2012).
Same-Sex Desires: "Immanent and Essential Traits Transcending Time and Culture" The Wild Reed (June 16, 2014).

Monday, June 16, 2014

Tan Lines


Image: Subject and photographer unknown.

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Ghost Hare


Notes the May 28, 2014 issue of The Scotsman:

A rare “ghost hare” has been captured on camera in the British countryside by a wildlife photographer.

Ron McCombe, 59, spotted the elusive creature, dubbed the ghost hare by locals, which has unusual silver fur, in fields north of Kelso in the Scottish Borders.

“I had heard from a local that there was a white hare in this area and after six months looking for it I thought he was having me on and the hare was just a myth,” said Mr McCombe, from Coldstream.

“Then one morning last week I saw it at a distance and couldn’t believe my eyes.

“Over the next five mornings I was in position by 5am and waited for it to come into view and then get a bit closer so I could get some reasonable images. The photography was very frustrating as the hare was very timid, but I got there in the end.”

Mr McCombe said: “It was very secretive and elusive, it didn’t behave like other brown hares. The Brown Hare Trust call the unusual colouring ‘colour mutation’.

“I’ve been photographing hares for ten years around the Scottish Borders and this is the first time I have seen a hare this colour.”



Image: Ron McCombe.

Monday, June 2, 2014

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Saint Godric and the Hare


The following is an excerpt from The Leaping Hare by George Ewart Evans and David Thomson.

In Beasts and Saints (1934) her collection of stories written from the fourth to the end of the twelfth century, Helen Waddell included the story of St. Godric and the hare. The saint planted vegetables in his garden to feed the poor but a thief began to steal them. One day the saint came upon the thief in the garden. It was a hare. "The saint caught it and struck it with his rod; and binding a bundle of vegetables on its shoulders sent it off with these words:'See to it that neither thyself nor any of they acquaintance come to the place again; nor dare encroach on what was meant for the need of the poor.' And so it befel." Thereafter the hare, presumably in a state of grace, came under the saint's protection; and if a hare was caught in a snare the saint would release it; and if a hare was fleeing from the huntsman he would take it into his house and protect it until the hunt had gone away.

– George Ewart Evans & David Thomson
The Leaping Hare
p. 223

See also the previous posts:
Melangell, Patron Saint of Hares
The Hare and the Great Flood
The Easter Hare


Opening Image: Ernie Janes.

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Saturday, May 10, 2014

The Self-Sacrificing Hare


Writes Simon Carnell in Hare:

In India, in one of the Jataka stories reputed to have been told by the Buddha himself, Bodhisattva is born in one of his incarnations as a hare. In this form he preaches to several other animals the necessity of giving alms, and when they are visited by the god Sakka in the form of a hungry Brahmin, each of them offers food. But only the hare does so in an appropriate form, following the law that no life should be destroyed. He not only offers to sacrifice himself by leaping into a fire, but shakes his body three times to rid it of any creatures living in his fur. The offer is declined but, as a reward for his virtue, the incident is commemorated by the god by painting the hare's image on the moon. In another version the hare begins to carefully pick the insects from his fur in preparation for his death, and in a Sri Lankan version it is the Buddha himself who meets the self-sacrificing hare, rescues him from the fire and puts him on the moon.


Image: Takagi Haruyama (1850).

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The Art of Felix d'Eon

Following is a selection of some of the Leveret's favorite works of art by the talented Felix d'Eon. Be sure to visit his website!


"Private Portrait 1" by Felix d'Eon.


"Aaron Reclining" by Felix d'Eon.


"Russian Embrace" by Felix d'Eon.


"River Bank Waves" by Felix d'Eon.


"La Fin De La Fête Costumée" by Felix d'Eon.


"Rapturous Love" by Felix d'Eon.


"Blue Brandon" by Felix d'Eon.


"Samurai Shunga" by Felix d'Eon.


"Love in the Ring" by Felix d'Eon.

Monday, April 28, 2014

Sunday, April 20, 2014